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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
on monday. >>> and titans of talk. oprah winfrey and david letterman one-on-one in a frank interview about her early life, hard times and accomplishments. >> if there was a number one reason why you've been able to be successful in your life, for me, it is listening to that still small voice. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. u.n. ambassador susan rice travels to capitol hill today to confront some of her toughest critics. she'll discuss and explain her comments about the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya, the first of several meetings with key lawmakers, a test of sorts as the president considers nominating rice to be the next secretary of state. margaret brennan has our report. >> reporter: u.n. ambassador susan rice hopes to put that controversy to rest, and if she succeeds, it would remove the largest political hurdle to her nomination as secretary of state. at 9:30 this morning, rice will meet behind closed doors with three of her most vocal critics, republican senators john mccain, kelly ie ya and lindsey graham.
. >> back tomorrow. >> letterman is next. ( band playing "late show" theme ) >> from new york, the greatest city in the world, it's the "late show" with david letterman. tonight...
. ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> monday time for letterman. i know you missed him all weekend. >> monday is in the book. our next newscast tomorrow morning at 4:30 a.m. >> i will be there. >> good night. ( band playing "late show" theme
at 4-30. david letterman is going to be funny with alec baldwin. >> from new yor
letterman now. >> can't wait! ( ying "late show" theme )
" with david letterman.
city in the world, it's the "late show" with david letterman. tonight...
with david letterman after refusing to talk to him for 16 years. and rick warren coming up. >> that letterman thing was done at ball state in indiana? >> it was. they were supposed to talk for an hour, instead they went an hour and 45 minutes. a really wide ranging conversation. >> i bet that's great stuff. >> should be interesting. thank you. remember, "cbs this morning" starts at 7:00. >>> we have been hearing the weather word all morning long and it does not look good. a lot of water coming our way. >> there really is. it's the biggest most extended rain that we have had in a long time in the bay area. it doesn't begin today but when it starts tomorrow, man, you will know it. out the door, we have some widespread fog but not as dense as yesterday. mostly cloudy skies for the bay for the remainder of your tuesday, we can seat bay bridge today but in the weather headlines we'll increase the clouds, winds pick up, rain spreads south starting tomorrow probably right in the middle of the morning commute. elizabeth and lawrence will have their hands busy tomorrow. tomorrow low pressure. that's
. >> or a letterman show. >> something like that. >> i will tell you something that has changed enormously. when "nightline" began in march of 1980, you did not have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would rerun some old cop drama. but among the three programs, "the tonight show," the cop drama and "nightline," we had 70% of all the homes watching television at 11:30 at night. >> really? >> 70%. these days, "the tonight show," "nightline" and the letterman show are lucky to have 25%. that's what's happened because what you didn't have 35 years ago was cable, satellite, you know, the internet, and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the networks. >> so maybe twilight is too soft a word. >> no, because you still have -- i mean, even though it's only 25%, the evening news casts, for example. among the three of them, i suspect they still have between 15 and 20 million viewers every night. >> more than that, 20 to 25 million. >> 20 to 25 million. when you and i were reporting from the state department, it was 40 million, 50 million. cronkite alone probably had about 20
'm going to make you a big stalker sign. for a while, 16 years, oprah winfrey and david letterman were mortal talk show enemies. >> that's right. the public feud between the talk -- two high powered talk show hosts was one of the most talked about battles in tv. the two have since buried the hatchet years ago in fact. now they're doing some joint appearances. jenna coy reports from indianapolis. >> reporter: oprah winfrey shared her signature wisdom with ball state university students monday. she appear bfrd a crowd of more than 3,000 as part of alum david letterman's professional workshop and lecture series an got a rousing welcome. >> ladies and gentlemen, do me a favor. please welcome oprah winfrey. [ cheers and applause ] >> everybody is on the journey, the adventure of your life is to discover what your journey is. >> reporter: dave was a big draw too, but it was oprah, students were looking to for inspiration. and this media icon from humble beginnings didn't disappoint with nugget after nugget of powerful insights. >> if there was a number one reason why you've been able to be s
letterman. david letterman important the kennedy center honors. he's one of the recipients. it's a high honor for him and he was great. i mean natural, insightful, funny. >> i can't wait to see it. >> a london tradition is in >> in case you hadn't heard president obama defeated mitt romney. we know this for sure despite fact that the returns from florida still have not been counted. [ laughter ] some people had to wait five or six hours to vote there. what goes on in florida. they had four years to fix that. and four years before that. we have to make sure florida never gets the olympic. >> florida. wow. >> no hanging chads this time but as you heard the presidential race in florida is again too close to call. we haven't called it yet. unlike 2000 the final outcome does not decide who wins. >> long time "miami herald" columnist carl hiassen is here to talk about the florida vote. his best selling novel is called "chomp." what is it with florida as kimmel said? >> we're in a state of euphoria because it didn't come down to us. we all live in dread of another repeat of bush versus gore. i
. [ laughter ] >> oh, boy. [ laughter ] >> leave it to david letterman, right? >> well, he's pretty funny. he is going to miss the election because that's usually all he talks about. >> lots of jokes there. >>> president obama is busy back at work after winning re- election. >> he and the first family returned to the white house yesterday after tuesday night's victory celebration in chicago. he has a busy few weeks ahead working with republicans and democrats to avoid the "fiscal cliff." if congress does not act during its lame duck session, there will be an automatic tax increase and spending cuts. >> that's the so-called "fiscal cliff." and it's one factor in a big sell-off on wall street. jill schlesinger, editor at large for cbsmoneywatch.com, joins us now. so jill, what caused the selling? >> reporter: well, you know, it was a bit of that "fiscal cliff." but now there's some serious concerns about the eurozone right now. and that was what got investors kind of freaked out early yesterday morning. dow plunging 313 points or 2.4% to 12,932. s&p down 33 to 1394. nasdaq down 2.5% to 2937. a
't not have been born. >> you did not have the tonight show or the letterman show. >> i will tell you something that has changed enormously. when nightline began in march of 1980, you did not have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would be run some old and trauma, but among the three programs, but tonight show, the cop drama, and nightline we had 70% of homes watching television at 11:00 at night. these days they are lucky to have 25%. that is what happened because what you did not have 35 years ago was cable, satellite the internet, and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> maybe twilight is too soft. >> you still have evening newscasts. among the three of them, i suspect we have between 15 million and 20 million viewers. it was 50 million. cronkite alone probably have about 20 million people. >> that certainly is true. the responsibilities of journalism to democracy and to our society. i want you to talk about about a little bit more. i want you to explain why there is this connection between the flow of news and a vibrant society. >> if
or the letterman show, something like that. >> one of the things that is change in all this, when "nightline" began in march 1980, you had, you didn't have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would rerun some old cop drama, but among the three programs, the tonight show, the cop drama and "nightline," we had 70% of all the homes watching television at 11:30 p.m. 70%. these days, the tonight show, "nightline," and the letterman show are likely to have 25%. that's what's happened because what you didn't have 35 years ago was cable, satellite, you know, the internet. and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> so maybe twilight is too soft a word? [laughter] >> no. because you still have, even though it's only 25%, the evening newscasts, for example. among the three of them i suspect they still have between 15 and 20 million viewers every night. >> more than that. 20-25 million. >> when you and i were reporting from the state department, it was 40 million, 50 million. i mean, i think cronkhite alone probably had about 20 million people. >> every night. that cer
.to love dave letterman. income back to cbs "this you're i i'm nora o'donnell in new york. charlie rose, you're in my chair sitting rton. he i'm sitting right here. i feel the great not of the chair. >> >> miss you. >> i meiss you, and i'll be bac tomorrow. >>> there's a sense of unit here in washington because there's orientation for the newest members of congress. chip reid is out the capitol. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, and good morning to our viewers out west. earlier this morning the 80 or so new member of congress gathered on the capitol steps for their freshman class photo. they won't be sworn in until january, but they're here this week for a crash course on congress 101. the halls of the u.s. capitol hel a bit like high school this week, returning congressman strut with the confidence of >> r seniors. >> good morning. em reporter: newly elected embers seem like eager freshmen. >> on the scale of one to ten, one your? are you? >> a ten. it is exciting. >> reporter: there are nearly 80 ew members in the house including indiana's susan usanks. >> it has been a
david letterman. >>> an estimated 24 million americans will get on a plane this holiday weekend. >>> right now are you thinking of staying home from work? before you pick up that phone, here's dr. holly phillips. >> reporter: good morning. today on "health watch" when to call out sick. flu and cold season is here and inevitably some of us are going to wake up feeling lousy faced with the decision of whether to call out sick to work. here are some simple rules to when to pull up the covers. if you've got a fever, especially one over 102, accompanied by aches and pains, that could be a sign that you've got the flu. a sure choice for staying home. now, a milder fever with a sore throat and white patches on your tonsils suggests strep throat. in that case stay home and visit your doctor. you may need antibiotics. a mild cough, nasal congestion and low-grade fever may just be the common cold. if you feel up to it you can go into work but be kind to your co-workers and wash your hands before touching shared computers or appliances and cough into your elbow. researcher
the simplicity of the clinton years? >> got to love dave letterman. welcome back to cbs "this morning." i'm norah o'donnell in new york and charlie rose, hey you're in my chair in washington. >> i'm sitting right here. i feel the greatness of the chair. >> miss you. >> i miss you and i'll be back tomorrow. there's a sense of newness here in washington because it's or yerntsation week for the newest members of congress. chip reid is outside of the capitol. good morning. >> reporter: in just a few minutes the 80 or so wide eyed new members of the house of representatives will be gathering on the steps behind me for their efficiefreshman class. the halls of the u.s. capitol feel a bit like high school, returning congressmen struck with the confidence of seniors. >> good morning. >> reporter: while newly elected members seem like eager freshmen. >> on the appointment scale of one to ten where your? >> ten. it's exciting. >> reporter: there's 80 new members in the house including indiana's susan brooks. >> a lot of rules. a lot of discussion about, you know, the dose and don'ts. >> reporter: a lot of
think when you see clips like david letterman and denis leary talking about your product? what do you think when you see something like that? >> honestly, i think it comes back to the impact we're having and the fact that you look around anywhere in the world and people are using it. i was out last night and saw people using it in a restaurant. you go to tokyo, you see people using it in a bar. anywhere you go, instagram is there. >> and then you're on to the cover of "time" magazine. so major news events like hurricane sandy and "time" magazine. is that your expectation, kevin? >> the expectation, at least early on, was that we would try to have that amount of impact. but to see hurricane sandy photos come in and realize that people are documenting a world event that everyone's going to look back on in 20 years and realize that instagram was at the center of this world event. >> you had ten instagram photos per second with hurricane sandy. the election, too, record number of photographs taken. there's a kind of journalism in some ways that goes along i think with social media. we've
for that appetite common and it wouldn't not have been born. >> you did not have the tonight show or the letterman show. >> i will tell you something that has changed enormously. when nightline began in march of 1980, you did not have the letterman show yet on cbs. they would be run some old and trauma, but among the three programs, but tonight show, the cop drama, and nightline we had 70% of homes watching television at 11:00 at night. these days they are lucky to have 25%. that is what happened because what you did not have 35 years ago was cable, satellite the internet, and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> maybe twilight is too soft. >> you still have evening newscasts. among the three of them, i suspect we have between 15 million and 20 million viewers. it was 50 million. cronkite alone probably have about 20 million people. >> that certainly is true. the responsibilities of journalism to democracy and to our society. i want you to talk about about a little bit more. i want you to explain why there is this connection between the flow of news and
%. these days the tonight show, nightline and the letterman show are lucky to have 25%. that's what's happened because when you didn't have to be five years ago was cable, satellite, the internet and all of those things have diluted the importance and the reach of the network. >> semidey twilight is too soft to work. [laughter] know because you still have even though it is only 25% the evening newscast for example. among the three of them i suspect they still had between 15 to 20 million viewers. >> 20, 25 million to be a >> when you and i were voting from the state department it was 40 million, 50 million. i think cronkite alone probably had about 20 million people. that certainly is true. >> the responsibilities of journalism to democracy and to our society i want you to talk about a lot more. i want you to explain to me why there is this connection between the flow of news and a vibrant society. >> if the american public were voting is ignorant of the issues, is on informed how can make intelligent decisions about who to pick? it's bad enough that the citizens united decision of the supreme
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)